Useful Words For Literature Essays

50 Essays Vocabulary Words

tending to complain; whining
relating to quantity; measurable
indifferent, calm, and unconcerned
demonstrating or applying and undiscriminating or unselective approach
attributing human characteristics to non humans
pretend something, invent something
relieve something unpleasant
in vein, having no useful result
confident; cheerfully optimistic
desire to benefit humanity
refinement; upper class status
practical way of thinking about results
offspring; something resulting
snobby and pretentious manner
too concerned with formal rules and details
passionate argument, often controversial
making people angry or excited, sexually arousing
candor-honest; directness
alter something to make less strong
get rid of something completely
very knowledgeable through study
something coming before; word that subsequent word refers to
deliberate repetition of words or sentence structure for effect
a figure of speech in which an attribute is used to represent the whole thing
create or arise; have offspring
authorization to do something
belief that people are insincere
vicarious understanding of another's feelings; especially due to similar or shared experience
strongly negative feeling
conflict of ideas or attitudes; uncertainty
a message with an instructive purpose
the concurrent response of two or more of the senses to the stimulation of one
advance knowledge of things
gloomy, mournful; especially to an excessive degree
somebody with right or skill, a word or phrase that modifies or restricts the meaning of another word or phrase
a mild but earnest rebuke
sulky or ill-tempered in a peevish manner
not restrained by moral or ethical principals
unchanging or unchangeable
direct opposite; figure of speech that use words or phrases to contrast each other to create a balanced effect
determine number or extent of something
bitter verbal or written attack
to refute, to prove false, to deny the truth of something
essential attribute, official requirement
useful, of value or benefit to something or someone
hostility; extreme hatred
hypothesis; suggestion that might be true
ineffective; unlikely to be successful
bitter sharp in tone, taste, or manner
rude or arrogant, lack of respect
flagrant, conspicuously bad or offensive
seeking of pleasure as a way of life
withholding information; not sincere
believability, willingness to believe
figure of speech in which part of something is used to signify the whole
relating to senses and the sense organs
act of verifying or ratifying something
abstruse; difficult to understand

Back in the late 90s, in the process of reading for my MA dissertation, I put together a collection of hundreds of sentence frames that I felt could help me with my academic writing later on. And they did. Immensely. After the course was over, I stacked my sentences away, but kept wondering if I could ever put them to good use and perhaps help other MA / PhD students.

So here are 70 sentences extracted and adapted for from the original compilation, which ran for almost 10 pages. This list is organized around keywords.

Before you start:
1. Pay close attention to the words in bold, which are often used in conjunction with the main word.
2. [   ] means “insert a suitable word here”, while (   ) means “this word is optional.”
3. Keep in mind that, within each group, some examples are slightly more formal / less frequent than others.

Argue
a. Along similar lines, [X] argues that ___.
b. There seems to be no compelling reason to argue that ___.
c. As a rebuttal to this point, it could be argued that ___.
d. There are [three] main arguments that can be advanced to support ___.
e. The underlying argument in favor of / against [X] is that ___.
f. [X]’s argument in favor of / against [Y] runs as follows: ___.

Claim
a. In this [paper], I put forward the claim that ___.
b. [X] develops the claim that ___.
c. There is ample / growing support for the claim that ___.
d. [X]’s findings lend support to the claim that ___.
e. Taking a middle-ground position, [X] claims that ___.

Data
a. The data gathered in the [pilot study] suggest that ___.
b. The data appears to suggest that ___.
c. The data yielded by this [study] provide strong / convincing evidence that ___.
d. A closer look at thedata indicates that ___.
e. The data generated by [X] are reported in [table 1].
f. The aim of this [section] is to generalize beyond the data and ___.

Debate
a. [X] has encourageddebate on ___.
b. There has been an inconclusive debate about whether ___.
c. The question of whether ___ has caused much debate in [our profession] [over the years].
d. (Much of) the current debate revolves around ___.

Discussion
a. In this section / chapter, the discussion will point to ___.
b. The foregoing discussion implies that ___.
c. For the sake of discussion, I would like to argue that ___.
d. In this study, the question under discussion is ___.
e. In this paper, the discussion centers on ___.
f. [X] lies at the heart of the discussion on ___.

Evidence
a. The availableevidence seems to suggest that ___ / point to ___.
b. On the basis of the evidence currently available, it seems fair to suggest that ___.
c. There is overwhelming evidence for the notion that ___.
d. Further evidence supporting / against [X] may lie in the findings of [Y], who ___.
e. These results provide confirmatory evidence that ___.

Ground
a. I will now summarize the ground covered in this [chapter] by ___.
b. On logical grounds, there is no compelling reason to argue that ___.
c. [X] takes a middle-ground position on [Y] and argues that ___.
d. On these grounds, we can argue that ___.
e. [X]’s views are grounded on the assumption that ___.

Issue
a. This study is an attempt to address the issue of ___.
b. In the present study, the issue under scrutiny is ___.
c. The issue of whether ___ is clouded by the fact that ___.
d. To portray the issue in [X]’s terms, ___.
e. Given the centrality of this issue to [my claim], I will now ___.
f. This [chapter] is concerned with the issue of [how/whether/what] ___.

Literature

a. [X] is prominent in the literature on [Y].
b. There is a rapidly growing literature on [X], which indicates that ___.
c. The literature shows no consensus on [X], which means that ___.
d. The (current) literature on [X] abounds with examples of ___.

Premise
a. The main theoretical premise behind [X] is that ___.
b. [X] and [Y] share an important premise: ___.
c. [X] is premised on the assumption that ___.
d. The basic premises of [X]’s theory / argument are ___.
e. The arguments against [X]’s premise rest on [four] assumptions: ___.

Research
a.This study draws on research conducted by ___.
b. Although there has been relatively little research on / into [X], ___.
c. In the last [X] years, [educational] research has provided ample support for the assertion that ___.
d. Current research appears / seems to validate the view that ___.
e. Research on / into ___ does not support the view that ___.
f. Further researchin this area may include ___ and ___.
g. Evidence for [X] is borne out by research that shows ___.
h. There is insufficient research on / into ___ to draw any firm conclusions about / on ___.

View
a. The consensus view seems to be that ___.
b. [X] propounds the view that ___.
c. Current research (does not) appear(s) to validate such a view.
d. There have been dissenters to the view that ___.
e. The answer to [X] / The difference between [X] and [Y] is not as clear-cut as popular views might suggest.
f. The view that _____ is in line with [common sense].
g. I am not alone in my view that ___.
h. [X] puts forward the view that ___.
i. [X]’s views rest on the assumption that ___.

If you found this list useful, check out The Only Academic Phrasebook You’ll Ever Need, which contains 600 sentences, as well as grammar and vocabulary tips. E-book and paperback available on Amazon.

 

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